Futurist Reveals the New Jobs AI will Create?

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Friday, August 4th, 2017
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Image source: CMRubinWorld

CMRubinWorld interviews futurist and global thought leader Charles Fadel about artificial intelligence eliminating 38% of jobs in the next 15 years and the new jobs technology will create.

In a new interview with CMRubinWorld, author and global thought leader Charles Fadel discusses the four different job types and the likelihood of them being offshored or automated. He notes that “routine impersonal work, such as basic accounting, call center operators, and airline help desks” are already being offshored and “are moving towards further automation”. Non-routine impersonal work such as X-Ray interpretation and pathologists, legal discovery, and document editors are becoming

“increasingly offshored even though they are harder to automate.” The third job group is routine personal work, such as taxi drivers and cleaning services which he says “will remain on shore but also might become jobs for robots.” As for CEOs and surgeons, Fadel notes that these types of jobs “will most likely remain onshore for a long time, and are also harder to automate.” Fadel adds that artificial intelligence, despite taking away jobs, might create high-paying jobs such as the app developer, the driverless car engineer, and the big data analyst.

Fadel believes that the automation of jobs and the competencies required for the jobs of the future require a new approach to education. Education systems must make themselves relevant. "We need courageous cathedral builders! We also need to address traditional experts’ biases clinging to their narrow domains, parents’ old personal experiences biasing their views, and teachers’ and administrators’ lack of training and leadership, respectively,” says the futurist. "We talk about flipping the classroom, we must talk about flipping the curriculum,” says Fadel.

“Jobsolescence” – Does Charles Fadel Have the Answers?

“We need courageous cathedral builders! We also need to address traditional experts’ biases clinging to their narrow domains, parents’ old personal experiences biasing their views, and teachers’ and administrators’ lack of training and leadership, respectively.” — Charles Fadel

All around us we are witnessing disruptive automation that is changing lives and taking away the jobs many have relied on to make a living. According to a recent report by PwC, within 15 years, artificial intelligence will take over 38% of U.S. jobs. But will this trend continue even further, and to what extent does AI pose a threat to most of our jobs?

Charles Fadel says ”yes, but…” In the interview that follows, the Founder and Chairman of the Center for Curriculum Redesign acknowledges that the Digital Revolution will force many jobs to become obsolete. However, all is not lost. Fadel believes new and higher paying occupations will develop as a result of automation; what we must do now is reform education to ensure our kids don’t get left behind. J. Hawksworth, PwC’s chief economist, agrees, stating “Knowledge will be a commodity so we need to shift our thinking on how we skill and upskill future generations.” Dr. Carl Frey, one of the most widely cited scholars in the field of workforce automation and industrial renewal from the Oxford Martin School, University of Oxford, also confirms, “Social and creative skills are most difficult to automate. Those are the ones that most workers will have to acquire.”
Exploring topics such as “What should students learn for the 21st century?” and “Making Education More Relevant,” Fadel’s research into education, and more specifically, curriculum, has focused on developing innovative ways to revamp education systems to make learning more relevant.

The first step? Changing perspectives. We all have personal biases, however, Fadel claims parents and educators must acknowledge and reform their dated opinions so they do not interfere with preparing the younger generation for their AI futures.

 

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